Tuesday, January 3, 2012

Apple making a big MOVE for EBOOKS

It looks like Apple is getting in the game of self published authors this month. Good eReader is reporting that Apple is going to "launch an new digital platform" that will get their share of the success that Amazon (KDP) and Barnes and Noble (Publit) has seen over the last fifteen months.
eBookNewser reports: “There’s no word yet on when the event will take place, but the fact there are 2 inside sources does lend a lot of weight to the rumor. Also, consider the timing of the leak. CES is next week, and once again Apple has managed to upstage the trade show. This is exactly what they did with the original iPad launch 2 years ago. Everyone at CES 2010 talked about the Apple event, and that’s probably going to happen here, too.”
What does this mean for authors? 
This is great for self-published authors because the only way to published on Apple products is through Smashwords. And that can take up to six weeks. With the option to upload to an Apple publishing, the author will be able to get their product out faster like they can do with KDP and pubit.
Is this something we saw coming? YES! As soon as we heard that KDP was coming up with an Amazon exclusive, we knew that some other type of epublisher like Pubit or Smashwords might come up with something similar. But Apple? 
The fact that we do know is that Apple will announce their new venture this month and it has nothing to do with products. 
TechCrunch is reporting that “the event will not involve any hardware at all and instead will focus on publishing and eBooks (sold through Apple’s iBooks platform) rather than iAds. Attendance will also be more publishing industry-oriented than consumer-focused.”Apple "will use the EPUB format and make it very easy for people to convert their documents or existing books to comply with their format."
Why now? The CES, the worlds largest consumer technology tradeshow, is next week in Las Vegas. This isn't the first time Apple has announced something big before the show to steal the thunder. Apple did this two years ago with the IPad. So more than likely, Apple will take the show again with this news.

What do you think? Would you go with an exclusive Apple over Amazon's KDP select?

11 comments:

  1. Umm, Apple already has a direct upload. I've been using it for a year.

    Sounds like more "Apple has 394 percent of the book market" hype to me.

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  2. I know you can upload but it's not as easy as KDP. I've uploaded to them too, but you have to have the ISBN, fill out the form, and format in epub. It's really not self publishing friendly, so I think that is what they are going to.

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  3. I'm tellin' ya...I still believe it will be Apple that buys B&N and makes Nook their own or does away with Nook and just buys Nook's catalog of Ebooks.

    This is step one!!!

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  4. I upload directly to Apple and not via Smashwords, so I'm not sure about the statement in this. I do think it would be great if Apple took over B&N. We'd have two giants slugging it out, which I think would be good for the little guy.
    Right now, sales on Apple are pretty small compared to Amazon and Pubit.

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  5. Another interesting year ahead, whatever happens!

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  6. Yes, we upload directly to Apple as well. The issue was that we had to buy a Mac to do it.

    The question is whether or not they will allow true direct uploads (via PC, Linux, or Smartphone) and simplify the process.

    This is the biggest nuisance with the current Apple model.

    There are also issues with the platform showing your real name as the publisher of record using this method. We had to become a corporation in order to resolve that issue.

    It was a long and drawn out process that stretched out nearly 3 weeks, with frequent calls and emails to the mothership. It's an issue for anyone using a pen name.

    The other question is whether or not they will be changing their compensation model to the chintzy 35% that Amazon gives publishers with books under $2.99 .

    Hopefully, this is an overture by Apple to show that they are finally going to give the iBook Store some of the attention it deserves.

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  7. Hi, Bob. Yes, I upload directly to Apple too, but I think what this means is that they are going to make it more user friendly. Right now Apple requires so much more than every other uploader. And not everyone is as gung ho as we are in uploading our book and wanting it everywhere. This means that there will be more people using Apple.

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  8. DD, that option is still out there.

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  9. Vicki, you are so right. I've said that 2011 was the year for Indie authors to have a level playing field. This year I think we are going to see publisher making it more competitive with Indies with their authors. It's definitely going to be interesting.

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  10. "It was a long and drawn out process that stretched out nearly 3 weeks, with frequent calls and emails to the mothership. It's an issue for anyone using a pen name." YES!! Indie Book List. It's so hard to upload with their current model. The ISBN, the cover, the paper work, the file, epub etc...the Apple model right now does not make it easy.

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  11. This has very little to do with fiction and a heck of a lot more to do with non-fiction. Specifically, that huge share of the electronic potential market that nobody can quite figure out how to best leverage, and all the old guard are too busy having conniptions about.

    Textbooks.

    Apple really couldn't care less about a bunch of us indies having a more user-friendly experience. The tech is already there for them to make it as easy as possible for us, they just don't choose to use it (why else that ridiculous "gotta have a mac" to upload?).

    Apple is a Big Fish, and they're going after a deep, deep ocean. The one place where there's serious lag for electronic adoption is in textbook publishing. Textbooks are selected not by users or consumers, but by state governments (specifically, Texas. Everybody else then follows suit). Apple is gunning for getting an Apple device into the required curriculum for universities.

    Apple takes 30% of your 2.99 ebook--big whoop. 30% of a $75 e-textbook required for every undergrad accounting major at Whatsamatta U means Apple gets more money than God.

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